Horus Manure: Debunking the Jesus/Horus Connection

horus manure

This article was published in the Nov-Dec 2012 issue of Catholic Answers Magazine.

Many atheists, neo-pagans, and other disbelievers of Christianity claim the story of Jesus Christ was borrowed from earlier mythologies. In recent years, a claim has been making the rounds that Jesus is based on the Egyptian god, Horus.

Who was Horus?
Horus is one of the oldest recorded deities in the ancient Egyptian religion. Often depicted as a falcon or a man with a falcon head, Horus was believed to be the god of the sun and of war. Initially he appeared as a local god, but over time the ancient Egyptians came to believe the reigning pharaoh was a manifestation of Horus (cf. Encyclopedia Britannica, “Horus”).

What about Jesus?
The skeptical claims being made about Jesus are not always the same. In some versions he was a persuasive teacher whose followers later attempted to deify him by adopting aspects of earlier god-figures, while in others he is merely an amalgamation of myths and never really existed at all. Both versions attempt to provide evidence that the Gospel accounts of the life of Christ are rip-offs.

In the 2008 documentary film Religulous (whose name is a combination of religion and ridiculous), erstwhile comedian and political commentator Bill Maher confronts an unprepared Christian with this claim. Here is part of their interaction.

Bill Maher: But the Jesus story wasn’t original.
Christian man: How so?
Maher: Written in 1280 B.C., the Book of the Dead describes a God, Horus. Horus is the son of the god Osiris, born to a virgin mother. He was baptized in a river by Anup the Baptizer who was later beheaded. Like Jesus, Horus was tempted while alone in the desert, healed the sick, the blind, cast out demons, and walked on water. He raised Asar from the dead. “Asar” translates to “Lazarus.” Oh, yeah, he also had twelve disciples. Yes, Horus was crucified first, and after three days, two women announced Horus, the savior of humanity, had been resurrected.

Maher is only repeating things that are and believed by many people today. Similar claims are made in movies such as Zeitgeist and Religulous and in pseudo-academic books such as Christ in Egypt: The Jesus-Horus Connection and Pagan Origins of the Christ Myth.

Often Christians are not prepared for this type of encounter, and some are even swayed by this line of argumentation.  Maher’s tirade provides a good summary of the claims, so let’s deconstruct it, one line at a time.

Written in 1280 BC, the Book of the Dead describes a God, Horus.
In fact, there are many “books of the dead.” But there is no single, official Book of the Dead. The books are collections of ancient Egyptian spells that were believed to help the deceased on their journey to the afterlife. The title Book of the Dead comes from an Arabic label referring to the fact that the books were mostly found with mummies (cf. The Oxford Guide to Egyptian Mythology, “Funerary Literature”). Some of these texts contain vignettes depicting the god Horus, but they don’t tell us much about him.

Our information about Horus comes from a variety of archaeological sources. What we do know from the most recent scholarship on the subject is that there were many variations of the story, each of them popularized at different times and places throughout the 5,000-year span of ancient Egyptian history. Egyptologists recognize the possibility that these differences may have been understood as aspects or facets of the same divine persona, but they nevertheless refer to them as distinct Horus-gods (cf. The Oxford Guide to Egyptian Mythology, “Horus”).

Part of the problem with the “Jesus is Horus” claim is that in order to find items that even partially fit the life story of Jesus, advocates of the view must cherry-pick bits of myth from different epochs of Egyptian history. This is possible today because modern archaeology has given us extensive knowledge of Egypt’s religious beliefs and how they changed over time, making it possible to cite one detail from this version of a story and another from that.

But the early Christians, even if they had wanted to base the Gospels on the Horus myths, would have had no way to do so. They might have known what was believed about Horus in the Egypt of their day, but they would have had no access to the endless variations of the stories that laid buried in the sands until archaeologists started digging them up in the 1800s.

Another part of the problem is that the claimed parallels between Jesus and Horus contain half-truths, distortions, and flat-out falsehoods. For example . . .

Horus is the son of the god Osiris, born to a virgin mother.
The mother of Horus was believed to be the goddess Isis. Her husband, the god Osiris, was killed by his enemy Seth, the god of the desert, and later dismembered. Isis managed to retrieve all of Osiris’s body parts except for his phallus, which was thrown into the Nile and eaten by catfish. (I’m not making this up).  Isis used her goddess powers to temporarily resurrect Osiris and fashion a golden phallus. She was then impregnated, and Horus was conceived. However this story may be classified, it is not a virgin birth.

He was baptized in a river by Anup the Baptizer, who was later beheaded.
There is no character named Anup the Baptizer in ancient Egyptian mythology. This is the concoction of a 19th-century English poet and amateur Egyptologist by the name of Gerald Massey (see sidebar 2 below). Massey is the author of several books on the subject of Egyptology; however, professional Egyptologists have largely ignored his work. In fact, his writing is held in such low regard in archaeological circles that it is difficult to find references to him in reputable modern publications.

In the book Christ in Egypt: The Horus-Jesus Connection (Stellar House Publishing, 2009), author D. M. Murdoch, drawing heavily from Gerald Massey, identifies “Anup the Baptizer” as the Egyptian god Anubis. Murdoch then attempts to illustrate parallels between Anubis and John the Baptist.

Some evidence exists in Egyptian tomb paintings and sculptures to support the idea that a ritual washing was done during the coronation of Pharaohs, but it is always depicted as having been done by the gods. This indicates that it may have been understood as a spiritual event that likely never happened in reality (cf. Alan Gardiner, “The Baptism of Pharaoh,” The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, vol. 36). This happened only to kings (if it happened to them at all), and one searches in vain to find depictions of Horus being ritually washed by Anubis.

Like Jesus, Horus was tempted while alone in the desert.
The companion guide to the film Zeitgeist outlines the basis for this claim by explaining, “As does Satan with Jesus, Set (aka Seth) attempts to kill Horus. Set is the ‘god of the desert’ who battles Horus, while Jesus is tempted in the desert by Satan” (p. 23).

Doing battle with the “god of the desert” is not the same as being tempted while alone in the desert; and according to the Gospel accounts, Satan did not attempt to kill Jesus there (cf. Matt. 4, Mark 1:12-13, Luke 4:1-13).

The relationship between Horus and Seth in the ancient Egyptian religion was quite different than the relationship between Jesus and Satan. While Seth and Horus were often at odds with each other, it was believed that their reconciliation was what allowed the pharaohs to rule over a unified country. It was believed that the pharaoh was a “Horus reconciled to Seth, or a gentleman in whom the spirit of disorder had been integrated” (The Oxford Guide to Egyptian Mythology, “Seth”). In stark contrast, there is never any reconciliation between Jesus and Satan in Scripture.

Healed the sick, the blind, cast out demons, and walked on water.
The Metternich Stella, a monument from the 4th century B.C., tells a story in which Horus is poisoned by Seth and brought back to life by the god Thoth at the request of his mother, Isis. The ancient Egyptians used the spell described on this monument to cure people. It was believed that the spirit of Horus would dwell within the sick, and they would be cured the same way he was. This spiritual indwelling is a far cry from the physical healing ministry of Christ. Horus did not travel the countryside laying his hands on sick people and restoring them to health.

He raised Asar from the dead. “Asar” translates to “Lazarus.”
The name Osirus is a Greek transliteration of the Egyptian name Asar. As I mentioned earlier, Osirus is the father of Horus, and, according to the myth, he was killed by Seth and briefly brought back to life by Isis in order to conceive Horus.  It was not Horus who raised “Asar” from the dead. It was his mother.

The name Lazarus is actually derived from the Hebrew word Eleazar meaning “God has helped.” This name was common among the Jews of Jesus’ time. In fact, two figures in the New Testament bear this name (cf. John 11, Luke 16:19-31).

Oh, yeah, he also had twelve disciples.
Again, this claim finds its origin in the work of Gerald Massey (Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World, book 12), which points to a mural depicting “the twelve who reap the harvest.” But Horus does not appear in the mural.

In the various Horus myths, there are indications of the four “Sons of Horus,” or six semi-gods, who followed him, and at times there were various numbers of human followers, but they never add up to twelve. Only Massey arrives at this number, and he does so only by referencing the mural with no Horus on it.

Yes, Horus was crucified first.
In many of the books and on the websites that attempt to make this connection, it is often pointed out that there are several ancient depictions of Horus standing with his arms spread in cruciform.  One can only answer this with a heartfelt “So what?”  A depiction of a person standing with his arms spread is not unusual, nor is it evidence that the story of a crucified savior predates that of Jesus Christ.

We do have extensive evidence from extra-biblical sources that the Romans around the time of Christ practiced crucifixion as a form of capital punishment. Not only that, but we have in the Bible actual eyewitness accounts of Jesus’ crucifixion. On the other hand, there is no historical evidence at all to suggest that the ancient Egyptians made use of this type of punishment.

And after three days, two women announced Horus, the savior of humanity, had been resurrected.
As I explained before, the story of the child Horus dying and being brought back to life is described on the Metternich Stella, which in no way resembles the sacrificial death of Jesus. Christ did not die as a child, only to be brought back to life because his grieving mother went to the animal-headed god of magic.

The mythology surrounding Horus is closely tied with the pharaohs, because they were believed to be Horus in life and Osirus in death. With the succession of pharaohs over the centuries came new variations on the myth. Sometimes Horus was believed to be the god of the sky, and at other times he was believed to be the god of war, at other times both; but he was never described as a “savior of humanity.”

Combating the never-ending list of parallels
If you do an Internet search on this subject, you will come across lists of supposed parallels between Jesus and Horus that are much longer than Bill Maher’s filmic litany. What they all have in common is that they do not cite their sources.

Should you encounter people who try to challenge you with these claims, ask them to explain where it is they got their information. Many times you will find that they originate with Gerald Massey or one of his contemporaries. Sometimes they have been repeated and expanded on by others. But these claims have little or no connection to the facts.

You should challenge the person making the claim to produce a primary source or a statement from a scholarly secondary source that has a footnote that can be checked. Then make sure the sources being quoted come from scholars with a Ph.D. in a relevant field, such as a person who teaches Egyptology at the university level.

Due to the mass of misinformation on the Internet and in print on this subject, it is important to respond to these claims using credible sources. Fortunately, there are many good books on Egypt and Egyptology in print. But there are also bad ones, so make sure to verify the author’s credentials before purchasing them.

The study of ancient Egypt has come a long way since its beginning in the 1800s, and new discoveries are being made even today that improve upon our understanding of the subject. It’s safe to say they will do nothing to bolster the alleged Jesus-Horus connection.

The Horus mythology developed over a period of 5,000 years, and as a result it can be a complex subject to tackle. But you don’t have to be an Egyptologist to answer all of these claims. You just need to know where to look for the answers—and to be aware of the claims’ flawed sources.

Sidebar 1:
A brief history of modern Egyptology

The Rosetta Stone

Modern Egyptology really begins with the French campaign in Egypt and Syria initiated by Napoleon Bonaparte around 1798. Among other things, the French established a scientific exploration of the region.

In 1799, a soldier named Pierre-Francois Bouchard discovered the Rosetta Stone, which contained a bilingual text that eventually led to the translation of Egyptian hieroglyphs. Prior to this, our knowledge of ancient Egypt’s 5,000-year history was limited to what was known through the writings of pre-Christian Greek historians such as Herodotus and Strabo.

The discovery of the Rosetta Stone led to a renewed interest by the Europeans in all things ancient Egypt, commonly referred to now as “Egyptomania.”  It was not until nearly a century later that Egyptology as an academic discipline began to come into its own. Since that time, we have a much better understanding of ancient Egyptian history and culture.

Sidebar 2:
Massey scholarship

Gerald Massey

When researching the supposed Egyptian influences on Christianity, inevitably one comes across the name Gerald Massey. Massey was an English poet and amateur Egyptologist who lived from 1828 to 1907. He is the author of three books on the subject: The Book of the Beginnings, The Natural Genesis, and Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World. Because his books represent some of the earliest attempts to draw comparisons between the Christian and Egyptian religions, other writers attempting to draw these comparisons frequently cite them.

One recent example is the book Christ in Egypt; The Horus-Jesus Connection by D.M. Murdoch. In it the author states: “This present analysis of the claims regarding the correspondences between the Egyptian and Christian religions is not dependent on Massey’s work for the most part,” yet she devotes an entire chapter of the book to defending the authenticity of Massey’s scholarship (something she does not feel called to do for anyone else she quotes in her book) and thereafter adopting many of the same comparisons.

Critics of Massey’s work often point out that he had no formal education in the area of Egyptology. While this is a valid criticism, I think it is also important to point out that the study of ancient Egyptian religion has advanced far beyond what was known in the 19th century. Not only is much of Massey’s scholarship built on wild speculation, it is also the product of an academic discipline still in its infancy.

38 Thoughts on “Horus Manure: Debunking the Jesus/Horus Connection

  1. Bill Entrikin on October 26, 2012 at 11:06 am said:

    Great article Jon. Nice job of picking apart those false statements.

  2. Maggie on October 27, 2012 at 8:44 pm said:

    And after concocting this hoax, the Apostles all willingly died to preserve it? NOT! LOL

  3. Isn’t it enough proof that NO ONE has ever claimed to see an oil slick or an old bagel with the image of Horus?

  4. Chris M on October 27, 2012 at 9:05 pm said:

    Well written,simple to understand. I have heard this claim many times before and your rebuttal is clear, concise and easy to understand. Keep up the great work.

  5. Harry Wallington on October 28, 2012 at 5:09 pm said:

    It’s good to see support for the historical, as opposed to mythicist view – of Jesus.

  6. My first reaction to seeing these claims was, “Wow, this is nothing like what I remember of Egyptian mythology!” With good reason, it seems. Maybe the best response to such nonsense is to point the accuser to a good reference on Egyptian mythology.

  7. David Wagner on October 28, 2012 at 6:51 pm said:

    I knew that the comparison between Horus’ birth and Jesus’ didn’t stand because Isis and Osiris had sexual relations. Mary was miraculously conceived and did not know a man.

    I also knew that regardless of whether or not Horus was crucified and rose again three days later, it was certainly not for the purpose of atoning for the sins of humanity.

    But I appreciate very much the full account given in this article. Thank you.

  8. Someone pulled their subscription from this site because they felt that the site is quoting blasphmony and all blasphmony should be treated with a slap in the face and no rebuttle.
    I believe that it is the work of our clergy to teach us how to defend ourselves in the midst of the enemy and rebuke him. By slapping and ignoring the enemy you are playing right into his hands…you are using anger and hiding which are tools of the evil one.

  9. Mariusz on October 28, 2012 at 9:57 pm said:

    And the most important fact to consider is this: Bill Maher is a standup comedian, not a religious scholar or an Egyptologist. Why even bother with the badly regurgitated nonsense he spouts?

    • JONS1973 on October 30, 2012 at 7:08 am said:

      I took the time to reply to this claim because, as a former atheist, it’s something I believed myself. It doesn’t take much to sway the poorly catechized. Bill Maher is just a vehicle. He summed up the claim pretty well in his movie, but there are a ton of books and movies that make the same claims.

  10. I think you may have the etymology on “Asar” reversed. I believe “Asar” is actually the original Ancient Egyptian, and “Osiris” is the Greek transliteration.

    • JONS1973 on October 30, 2012 at 7:18 am said:

      I think you’re right. I’ll do some double checking when I have time and make the necessary corrections. Thanks for pointing that out. :)

  11. Fr. Robert Coogan on October 28, 2012 at 11:37 pm said:

    There are many myths throughout the world that make us think of the story of Jesus. It should not surprise us. St. Justin Martyr believed that these myths were seeds planted to prepare the pagans for the Gospel when it finally arrived. The Second Vatican Council picked up on this concept of the “seeds of the Gospel”. We are used to hearing of this in terms of Aristotelian philosophy, but Justin specifically mentions drama and myth as well as philosophy. We know the story of Prometheus was seen as a prefiguring of Christ by many Fathers of the Church. It lacks logic to think that, if Horus had fallen out of favor, someone would try to build a new religion on his story. Why would they expect that it would be successful, if Horus was not?

  12. I have fun with, cause I discovered just what I used to be taking a look for. You’ve ended my 4 day lengthy hunt! God Bless you man. Have a nice day. Bye

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  14. Joe Paul on October 29, 2012 at 10:19 am said:

    Great article on a topic that I like some Catholics have heard from time to time depending on the futility of the atheist or secularist we are speaking to. Can you possibly update the post with footnotes as to the sources of the material? As it is now, it sounds like a great refutation of the Jesus/Horus myth however the minute someone asks for our proof I will as dumb as Bill Maher and his ilk. Help defeat the ilk! Help us Jon Sorerson, you are our only hope!

    • JONS1973 on October 30, 2012 at 7:16 am said:

      Lol. We’re in big trouble if I’m the only hope! I used a bunch of different sources (some of them I name in the article). The one that I found the most useful was the Oxford Guide to Egyptian Mythology.

  15. Danny S on October 29, 2012 at 8:42 pm said:

    Great article, but I didn’t see a reference to any specific Egyptology works, or even scholars. I would like to something like that in this post. But also, let me know if I am just missing it.

    • Danny S on October 29, 2012 at 8:45 pm said:

      Okay, never mind. I take my comment back. I do see sources. But I think it would be an extra advantage to your arguments if you listed all the sources you used at the bottom of the article as well. Just a thought.

  16. Pingback: Bad Art and Horus Manure — The Curt Jester

  17. We ougt to make our own movie, called “Atheistupid”. Bill Maher alone would make quite an interesting interview if confronted with the BS he presented in Religulous. hehe

  18. Pingback: Debunking the Jesus/Horus Connection | Nemoziz's Blog

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  20. Pingback: Bad arguments against Christianity. Part two (2) | Life and a Christian.

  21. What about the story of NOAH? IT
    t was a story made by GIGLAMESH in Iraq 1500yrs before jesus. How do we explain that?

    • JONS1973 on August 13, 2014 at 6:18 am said:

      The Old Testament is older than Jesus, so the dating of Gilgamesh doesn’t bother me. Many ancient cultures have flood stories. Perhaps that is because there was a great flood in ancient times. The story of a Noah is probably the one that was passed down in Jewish culture. There are a few plausible theories in this regard. Perhaps I’ll write something on this when I can find the time.

  22. From the article:
    Should you encounter people who try to challenge you with these claims, ask them to explain where it is they got their information.
    -
    And where do you get your information? From the bible? Unless you can prove the existence of God, the bible has zero credibility.

    • JONS1973 on August 12, 2014 at 5:23 am said:

      I cited all the sources where I got my information in the article. What does proving the existence of God have anything at all to do with whether or not Jesus and Horus have parallel stories?

  23. Well, because if there is no God, there was no Jesus. This is basically arguing over two mythical characters.

    • JONS1973 on August 13, 2014 at 6:10 am said:

      That argument is pretty weak. If there’s no God, that would only prove that Jesus was not divine. It wouldn’t prove Jesus never existed. The argument in my article is that the attributes of Jesus and Horus are nothing alike. Whether you believe in either one is irrelevant.

  24. baden snaxx on August 17, 2014 at 11:13 am said:

    I noticed you did not give a full explanation of how Isis became impregnated with Horus. There was no physical contact, she hovered above Osisris, & became pregnant. I presume you were aware of this & didn’t include it because it weakens your argument. How different was Horus’ conception to that of Jesus?
    You also didn’t mention that the Egyptian Empire encompassed the Holy Land more than a few times. The people of this region would be more than knowledgeable about Egyptian religions, 1000′s of years before the arrival of modern archaeology.
    Crucifixion was carried out in Egypt, in fact, the evidence suggests that’s where it started.
    Your research is weak, & your explanation dishonest, but oh so apologetic.

    • JONS1973 on August 18, 2014 at 12:33 am said:

      There was no physical contact. According to the legend, Isis was impregnated by a prosthetic phallus. The Egyptian empire did at times encompass the area of Jerusalem, but that does not negate my point. The Egyptians themselves were not fully aware of the various Horus legends. As far as crucifixion, there is no evidence that it was used by Egyptians. I cited the latest scholarly research on the subject. If I am supposed to take any of your points seriously, then perhaps you should do the same.

      • baden snaxx on August 18, 2014 at 11:52 am said:

        What you are attempting is historical revision in the name of your religion, it is both repugnant & immoral.
        According to Crucifixion in Antiquity, Crucifixion was popular in many countries. The Assyrians, Phoenicians, Persians, Babylonians, Macedonians,Romans, & the Carthagians. The Carthagians apparently learned it from the Egyptians, who crucified people on trees. Genesis 40;19 has long been thought to be referencing crucifixion in Egypt.
        You misrepresent the God Set. yes, he was god of the desert, he was also God of storms, chaos, & violence. But more importantly he was seen as evil. The people of Ancient Egypt saw Set in the same way as Christians see Satan.
        It is clear in Egyptian religious texts that Isis hovered above the phallus of Osiris, & in that way became impregnated with Horus. There was no physical contact, nowhere does it say, or suggest there was. There was no proof, or claim, that Isis was a virgin.
        You clearly have not read the Pyramid texts, the Coffin texts,Book of Going Out, book of Gates, the Amduat. If you had, you would have been aware of the above, & the resurrection of Osiris, by Horus, something which you deny occurred. One of the most well known facts of Ancient Egypt.
        There are many statues, depictions of Isis, seated holding the infant Horus, in the exact same pose as depicted in devotional works of art of Mary, & the infant Jesus.
        In fact there is a picture in a book written by a Dr J Lundy, of Horus raising his father Osiris from the dead. Dr Lundy’s book is Monumental Christianity, he was a Reverend, & devout Christian. He relates how the story of Jesus raising Lazarus from the dead, as in the Gospel of St John, is without doubt taken from the story of Horus & Osiris. Osiris’
        resurrection takes place in the city of Any, it is not a coincidence that Bethany, or Bethanu was the place of Lazarus’ resurrection, Beth being the Hebrew word for house, placed in front of Any it becomes Bethany/Bethanu.
        If you read the Pyramid Texts alongside the Gospel of St John, the similarity of the two stories of resurrection is obvious, they are undeniably the same story.
        Did you know that Christian Coptics shouted “Jesus, Horus” as part of a prayer during childbirth.
        It’s ridiculous to claim the people, who had been under the Egyptian Empire, had no knowledge of the religion, Gods of Ancient Egypt. On what do you base this claim, because it’s long been accepted that myths, religions were chiefly spread by the invading armies of antiquity. Egypt is mentioned in the Bible many times. If Exodus is true, & factual, then Moses & the Israelites would have been well educated to the Egyptian culture.
        These similar stories are not of recent invention, as you also claim, Christians, & others have known about this since Christianity was forming. Dr Lundy brought it up in the mid 19th century. Bishop Theodurus attempted to destroy the Temple of Isis, at Philae, he left an inscription boasting of this destruction. Pope Gregory XVI, again aware of the connection, sent an expedition under the guise of archaeologists in 1841, & what was left of any importance was totally destroyed, or stolen & brought to the Vatican.
        As I said before your research was weak, you have misinterpreted facts, omitted facts, & denied what is fact, in an attempt to justify your argument. It is dishonest, & typically apologetic.

        • JONS1973 on August 18, 2014 at 10:57 pm said:

          There is no evidence at all that the Egyptians practiced anything like crucifixion. Hanging someone from a tree is just not the same thing, and even if it were, there is zero evidence in the historical record that this happened to Horus or any other Egyptian deity.

          I did not misrepresent Set. I was quoting from the Oxford Guide of Egyptian Mythology. The people of ancient Egypt did not see Set as an equivalent of Satan, and how they regarded him depended largely on what period and province you are talking about.

          No one takes Lundy’s scholarship seriously. Like Massey and others from his period, his work is full of historical inaccuracies and speculation, which is why I used only the most recent scholarship in writing the article.

          Your claim about the cities of “Any” and “Bethany” are parallels drawn from English words. In fact, the Hebrew word for house is Bayit, not Beth.

          If you can show me which pyramid texts read exactly like the Gospel of John, I would be happy to read them. All of the pyramid texts I have read are not narratives at all. They are collections of spells.

          No Coptic Christians shout “Jesus Horus” during childbirth. This is straight out of D.M. Murdock’s arguments and it’s silly.

          Finally, I did not say that the Jews of Jesus time had no knowledge of Egyptian religion. What I said is that the Christians of Jesus time would have had little, if any, knowledge of the literally hundreds of variations of the Horus mythology that existed thousands of years prior. I’m sure Moses would have been well educated in Egyptian mythology since he was raised as an Egyptian, but that doesn’t mean he or any other Jew would have passed that on to their children after the Exodus.

          Your claim about Pope Gregory XVI destroying the evidence is a convenient claim for you, but there’s no proof. Anyone can concoct a conspiracy theory based on an absence of evidence.

          The points you keep bringing up are based on outdated scholarship that was speculative to begin with, and has been repeated by hacks like D.M. Murdock and others.

  25. Your only “historical” references to Jesus are those from the Bible. So, you are basing your information all on one source which you cannot prove is true, nor does is it have chronological continuity. Show me other “historical” sources that are able to collaborate and support the Bible and perhaps you will have some ground to stand upon. What’s funny is that your supposed savior’s story is so similar to MULTIPLE other religions. Every large culture had some sort of savior figure. Also, Christianity is a religion based upon Judaism – a religion whose people doesn’t even believe there was a Christ. Nor do they believe in heaven or hell. Christianity supposedly is a religion of peace and forgiveness, yet it has subjugated, murdered, and committed more atrocities than any other group in history.

    • JONS1973 on August 18, 2014 at 1:20 am said:

      Whether or not there was a historical Jesus is beside the point. The claim I am refuting in this article is the one that says Jesus and Horus have parallel stories, and they don’t. As far as other historical sources that corroborate the Gospels, I have written about that on my blog several times.

  26. baden snaxx on August 21, 2014 at 1:03 pm said:

    Before I reply in full to what you have written above, I would like to clarify an important issue, & I am sure you will be helpful in answering a question.
    You dismiss the veracity of my claims, saying that my sources aren’t credible.
    You say “Which is why I used the most recent scholarship in writing the article”
    The story of Horus raising Osiris from the dead is well known. Something that you deny. Stating this never happened, which is wrong. It is an important aspect of the Ancient Egyptian religion.
    I cannot imagine why the latest scholarly reports didn’t cover this occurrence, & why they gave you the impression it never happened.
    If so, how credible are these reports?
    I suggest they have no credibility whatsoever.
    Or did they tell you that this happened?

    • JONS1973 on August 22, 2014 at 2:33 am said:

      It must not be that important because the pyramid texts that relate the story of Osiris say that he was raised from the dead in a zombie-like state by Isis, at which point she breathes life into Osiris and copulates with him (this is popular in the pyramid texts) or she copulates with a phallus she fashions when she can’t find the real one (this is in Plutarch’s version). There is also a version where Isis may have been impregnated by a bolt of lightning, but the evidence for this is uncertain. It is only after this that Horus is born in most version. But the most popular version has Isis-not Horus-raising Osiris from the dead. I look forward to your response. I’m sure it will be filled with lots of 19th century speculation.

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